Photo

themaninthegreenshirt:

Joe Henderson and Alice Coltrane, 1973

Source: themaninthegreenshirt
Video
Video
Photo
Video

Nicholas Krgovich - “Along the PCH on Oscar Night” (2014)

Text

Existence:

All you have
and all you
have to give.
What were you
expecting?
What more is
there than this?


—Cid Corman

Photo
Photo

magictransistor:

Halley’s Taucherglocke (Diving Bell), 1691.

Source: watson.ch
Audio

Baroque Jazz Trio / Latin Baroque

Baroque Jazz Trio (1970)

Source: yukayukari
Audio

ydegator:

Novi Singers - Torpedo (1970)

(via yukayukari)

Source: ydegator
Photo
Audio

pop-snacking:

last-chance-for-a-slowdance:

Push me away on this lucky lucky day

Polvo - Thermal Treasure

Source: last-chance-for-a-slowdance
Photo
Photo
ein-bleistift-und-radiergummi:

Lill Tschudi Linocut, 1930.
The painter and printmaker Lill Tschudi was born in Switzerland in 1911. Impressed by the work of Norbertine Bresslern-Roth, she studied linocut (which was to remain her favorite medium) at the Grosvenor School of Modern Art in London, then went to Paris to study with Gino Severini and Fernand Léger. Inspired by technology, speed and modern life, she completed some sixty linocuts in the 1930s dealing mainly with sport, work and the London Underground. In the postwar years, she turned towards abstract art, telling her mentor Claude Flight that the war had destroyed her ability to depict humanity in an optimistic light. In 1986, she was awarded the Swiss national print prize for her life’s work. She died in 2004.

ein-bleistift-und-radiergummi:

Lill Tschudi Linocut, 1930.

The painter and printmaker Lill Tschudi was born in Switzerland in 1911. Impressed by the work of Norbertine Bresslern-Roth, she studied linocut (which was to remain her favorite medium) at the Grosvenor School of Modern Art in London, then went to Paris to study with Gino Severini and Fernand Léger. Inspired by technology, speed and modern life, she completed some sixty linocuts in the 1930s dealing mainly with sport, work and the London Underground. In the postwar years, she turned towards abstract art, telling her mentor Claude Flight that the war had destroyed her ability to depict humanity in an optimistic light. In 1986, she was awarded the Swiss national print prize for her life’s work. She died in 2004.

(via ipnosarcoma)

Source: mheu.org
Photo

inneroptics:

Lumiere Brothers still

(via ipnosarcoma)

Source: inneroptics